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Chapel Prayer Card Reunites Friends

When David Black stuck a prayer card in the chapel wall at the last service in the Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel, he didn’t expect his old friend John Moore to find it.

The  attached card was left in the chapel wall in memory of the many years spent at the chapel where his family attended church together on the military base. He served as an altar server there, and his mother, Delores Black, served as sacristan for over 30 years.

When John Moore arrived with his crew to remove the chapel cupola and steeple before the bulldozers demolished the building, they found David Black’s card in the wall. It turns out John and David knew each other years ago and reconnected through the prayer card.

John Moore salvaged the original cupola and steeple from the WWII Army Air Base chapel and moved it to his home in Thornton Park Historic District. The chapel at the Orlando Naval Training Center was bulldozed to make way for the Baldwin Park residential community.

According to David Black: The chapel meant an awful lot to a lot of people and if it hadn’t been for John’s efforts – and John has minimized, I think, the time and money and the effort that he invested. But had he not done so there’d be no tangible reminder of what that chapel actually is. So I’ve always appreciated what John did.

Learn more about the meaning the chapel had as the center for community life on base in this excerpt (1:40) from an oral history interview with David Black and John Moore on May 10, 2012.

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David Black and John Moore
May 12, 2012 photo of David Black, left, and his good friend, John Moore at John's home in Orlando, FL.
Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel Steeple
May 12, 2012 photo of the Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel Steeple and Cupola  in its present location  in Thornton Park Historic...
Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel Steeple
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Chapel Prayer Card Reunites Friends
When David Black stuck a prayer card in the chapel wall at the last service in the Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel,...
Chapel Prayer Card Reunites Friends
When David Black stuck a prayer  card in the chapel wall at the last service in the Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel,...
Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel
No description has been added yet
Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel
No description has been added yet
Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel

Community engages as WWII chapel steeple is moved from its historic location on the old army air base, later the Naval Training Center, to downtown Orlando.

Read the Orlando Sentinel articles detailing John Moore's effort to relocate the chapel steeple to his home in Thornton Park.   

Listen to an excerpt (below) from an oral history interview with John Moore on May 12, 2012 in which he shares how people from the community read the articles in the paper and contacted him to tell about their memories of the chapel.




Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel

John Moore preserves the Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel steeple and cupola from the Naval Training Center. Read more. 

Moore explains the transition of the chapel from NTC to his home  in this excerpt  from an oral history interview on May 10, 2012. 

In its new home in Thornton Park Historic District the chapel is remembered as the steeple holds its place in Orlando's memory.




Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel

When David Black stuck a prayer card in the chapel wall at the last service in the Stephen L. Rusk Memorial Chapel, he didn't expect his old friend John Moore to find it.

The attached card   was left in the chapel wall in memory of the many years spent at the chapel where his family attended church together on the military base.  He served as an altar server there, and his mother, Delores Black, served as sacristan for over 30 years.

When John Moore arrived with his crew to remove the chapel cupola and steeple before the bulldozers demolished the building, they found David Black's card  in the wall. It turns out John and David knew each other years ago and reconnected through the prayer card.

John Moore salvaged the original cupola and steeple from the WWII Army Air Base chapel and moved it to his home in Thornton Park Historic District. The chapel at the Orlando Naval Training Center was bulldozed to make way for the Baldwin Park residential community.

According to David Black: The chapel meant an awful lot to a lot of people and if it hadn't been for John's efforts - and John has minimized, I think, the time and money and the effort that he invested. But had he not done so there'd be no tangible reminder of what that chapel actually is. So I've always appreciated what John did.

Learn more about the meaning the chapel had as the center for community life on base  in  this excerpt  from an oral history interview with David Black and John Moore on May 10, 2012.




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